Mr Twin Sister

Mr Twin Sister
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From Pitchfork:
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“Mr Twin Sister‘s reinvention continues apace on new single “In the House of Yes” (below). The Long Island band’s last album, 2011’s In Heaven, shuttled between dream-state aesthetics inspired by Sofia Coppola and David Lynch but they still scanned as an indie-pop outfit, distinctly American and distinctly suburban. But somewhere between that album and gaining the prefix in front of their new name, the band formerly known as Twin Sister seems to have ventured abroad in search of a distinctly European kind of sophistication. Last month, “Blush” channeled Sade via Portishead like some velvety Vogue editorial set on the banks of the Seine, and  “In the House of Yes” flashes back to the sounds of the French touch at its most opulent. The song’s swirling strings and flickering tendrils of guitar specifically invoke Alan Braxe and Ben Diamond’s classic remix of Björk’s “Alarm Call”, while Andrea Estella’s rounded vowels and oddly bitten diction even recall the Icelandic singer herself. But the song goes way beyond mere pastiche. The pneumatic pianos and wispy atmospherics also suggest Black Box as remixed by Vladislav Delay; it’s slinky, seductive, and somehow timeless.” – Philip Sherburne
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Mr Twin Sister is out September 23 via Infinite Best/ Twin Group
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Suicideyear: Remembrance

original
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From Bleep.com:
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Software Recording Co., the label in part run by Daniel Lopatin aka Oneohtrix Point Never, present their first release from Baton Rouge producer James Prudhomme AKA Suicideyear. Remembrance follows on where the well-received Japan mixtape left off; constructing hard, trap-inspired percussion over gentle, minimalistic ambient soundscapes. The celestial ‘Hope Building A’  (below) fits the album’s title with its nostalgia-tinged, awe-inspiring organ riff complimented by tinkering percussion, widescreen pads and sparse snare fills.”
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Remembrance is out September 23.
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Goat: Commune


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From the bio:
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“On their second album Commune, Swedish psychedelicists GOAT deliver a heavy dose of acidic grooves, hypnotic incantations, and serpentine guitar lines, building on the much-lauded sound of World Music to explore new territories. Starting with the layered percussive groove, Eastern guitar flourishes, and convoking vocals of “Talk To God”, Commune re-establishes the trance-inducing rhythms and exotic blaze of guitar that characterized World Music. That spellbound pulse delves into darker and more propulsive territories on “Words” and “Goatslaves”, while “Goatchild” veers towards the transcendental pop of ‘60s Bay Area rock. The vintage psychedelic vibe permeates through songs like “The Light Within” and “To Travel The Path Unknown”—tracks that suggest that these rural Swedes operate on the same wavelength as the Turkish psych-folkies recently rediscovered by reissue labels like Finders Keepers. Commune reaches its apex when GOAT’s hymnal invocations meet a heavy dose of proto-metal fuzz on “Hide From The Sun” and “Gathering of Ancient Tribes”. Given the band’s lexicon and choice of iconography, it’s tempting to project pagan ritualism onto the sounds conjured by the collective, but the band asserts that the album seeks a more universal spirituality.”
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Commune is out September 23 on Sub Pop (US) and Rocket Recordings (EU); check out “Hide From The Sun” below.
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Vessel: Punish, Honey

vessel-7.24.2014
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From the press release: “With second album Punish, Honey, Vessel sought to create something that felt more organic even if the sounds themselves didn’t always feel inherently organic. That lessening interest in electronic sounds was concurrent with a burgeoning interest in natural sounds, in particular how the physical body has a direct effect on the nature of the sound, whether it be harsh or pure, messy, violent, seductive, or strange… he then created his own unconventional instruments using sheets of metal as percussion, sawing up bikes to make flutes and creating harmonic guitars all by his own hand”
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From the artist: “Let me just kill this off before it gets out of hand: This record was NOT influenced by ’70s Glam music’, Kevin Shields or Trip-Hop. Can all you budding journos out there take note; you can theorise all you like, but making definitive statements about an artist’s intentions or influences is a bad move. Unless you know better, it’s all FUCKING CONJECTURE. Ta. Now put it on and go fuck someone you love.”
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Punish, Honey is out now via Tri Angle Records; check out “Red Sex” below.
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The Juan Maclean: In A Dream

From the album bio:

“Nancy Whang’s voice has always been a kind of secret weapon on The Juan MacLean records, but In A Dream is her triumph. Just take a look above at the album art where she’s front and centre. This is the Nancy Show — you get all sides of Nancy on this record, a wide range of expression. These are all love songs, but emotions run wild. And you can’t pull this off without Nancy — she’s not living in these songs, she’s leading them.

Like every one of John Maclean’s records, this one quotes freely from house and techno and disco. Dead drums and vintage synthesizers are abundant. This is a DFA record, after all.”
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In A Dream is out September 16 on DFA Records: check out “A Place Called Space” below.
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Avi Buffalo: At Best Cuckold


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From the label:
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“Embarking upon a sophomore effort can be a daunting task for any young upstart, and there’s no denying Avi Buffalo’s own bar was set quite high with 2010’s celebrated eponymous debut. Fear not, dear fans/family/friends/friends of friends/newcomers, there’s nothing in this tale about The Second Album a.k.a. At Best Cuckold, that even remotely resembles a slump; in fact, it would be entirely appropriate to say that this Long Beach, California, enterprise is getting better with age… Mixed with Nicolas Vernhes at his Rare Book Room studio in Brooklyn, At Best Cuckold is a quirky yet comforting set of songs driven by refined pop songcraft and sneaky moments of grandeur that stick in the brain. Classic-sounding melodies are delivered with a modern sensibility, creating an album that’s equal parts timely and timeless. Well-placed piano, sax, clarinet, French horn, and cornet further enhance the proceedings with a glorious orch-pop sheen.”
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At Best Cuckold is out September 9 on Sub Pop; check out “So What” below.
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The Ukiah Drag: In The Reaper’s Quarters

 

04 Final Prayer

It would surely be unfair to suggest that the members of The Ukiah Drag are “bad” people just because they make music that sounds like it would kill you if it could. I guess it might feel so grizzly – so dank – because they all grew up around the Florida swamps; all those gases in the air and snakes and gators in the back yard must give a kid a taste for the sinister, right? And so what if their singer is the son of a stripper and an outlaw biker who has chosen to go by the kind of name (ZZ Ramirez) that makes him sound like an affiliate of both Marilyn and Charles Manson? I’m sure he’s a real sweet guy once you get to know him, when he’s not barking at you to hurry up and dig the hole that you’re about to be buried in. Right? Right? Truth is, if these fellas really were anywhere near as bad as In The Reaper’s Quarters – their first properly recorded long-player, out this week on Wharf Cat Records – makes them sound, they’d be in jail, cos this shit is pure evil. And we’re not talking about any of that wannabe gangsta hip hop posturing or pansy-ass black metal Satanism either (although it’s a pretty safe bet that they’re at least casually acquainted with that horny red dude). This is true True Detective nastiness, a trippy, nihilistic, existential punk blues that reeks of witchcraft and sex cults, ritual sacrifice and bodies in the basement; music for toothless glue-huffers to listen to while they decide whether to fuck their sisters or kill them. Recorded in a Lutheran church (where else?) by Ben Greenberg of The Men, In The Reaper’s Quarters is the kind of psychotic psychedelia that could have soundtracked the shitty end of the Sixties and would have sounded just as raw if it had been released at any point since. Okay, so it’s hardly a startlingly original sound – there isn’t much here that can’t be traced back within a few steps to either The Doors, The Velvet Underground & Nico or The Stooges’ debut album – but stealing from their elders is something these sickos have probably been doing since they were supposed to be at school, so not only are they very good at it, they’re also familiar enough with the tricks of the trade to change the plates and spray paint some flames on the hood before trying to pass that ride off as their own. That their hot-wired vehicle seems to be largely stuck in one gear is intentional: their vision – sludgy bass-lines and bone-rattling drums, wheezing organ and buzz-saw guitars, needling two-note riffs and smacked-out redneck Vincent Price vocals – is as singular as that of any serial killer, so much so that when they soften up ever so slightly for the penultimate closing time waltz “Wait And See” (Ramirez crooning “everything’s gonna be alright” in a way that implies it’ll be anything but) it feels as if they’re using some sort of “engine trouble” ruse to lure the listener over so they can smash them over the head with a wrench and bundle them into the trunk. But there I go again, casting aspersions on these nice boys’ characters when there’s no more reason to suspect them of any misdemeanour than there was to think that all rock & rollers would turn out to be devil worshipping deviants just because Elvis liked to swing his dick around (although imagine the smug look on the faces of a million Christian housewives after Altamont and the Tate murders). And to be honest, it doesn’t matter anyway: rock music has long been full of bad guys and unsavoury types and for the most part the ones that have been for real – the junkies, bullies, petty criminals and nut-jobs – have been far less entertaining than those openly playing a role. Strip away the peripheral stuff and it’s the music that matters, and the music here is as sharp, and as dirty, and as violent as any Cramps or Birthday Party or Gun Club fan could hope for; substitute the evil themes and occult undertones for lyrics about, oh I don’t know, spaceships and unicorns and …Reaper’s Quarters would still be a gloriously ugly example of lurching, acid-fried gutter punk done just right. Bad people, good people, whatever; these dudes have made a great rock album. And if they do end up going to hell, well… with tunes as good as these in their suitcase, the Devil will no doubt give them a very warm welcome. Check out “Her Royal Grip” and “Final Prayer” below.
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YOB: Clearing The Path To Ascend


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From the bio:
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“True ascension requires a destruction of those barriers that prevent any movement forward. Unsurprisingly, YOB pummels any and all of these obstacles with absolute authority, clearing the way for a genuinely visceral listening experience and climbing upward into a realm that sets the band in a heavy metal place that has been and will always remain wholly their own… These songs demand the tandem attention of mind, body, and soul – etching a mark across a sound that finds YOB as formidable and unequaled as they’ve ever been.”
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Clearing The Path To Ascend is out now via Neurot with a vinyl edition through Relapse from September 15; check out “Unmask The Spectre” below.
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Sinkane: Mean Love

How We Be
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Some words from the press release:
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“On the heels of a triumphant gig both performing and musical directing the live performances of Atomic Bomb! The Music of William Onyeabor in NYC, London, and LA (with guests like David Byrne, Damon Albarn, Luke from The Rapture, Dev Hynes, and Alexis from Hot Chip) we are super stoked to both announce and release the second Sinkane album on DFA. Ahmed and crew really knocked it out of the park on this one… It’s soul music! A truly universal sound, uniting rhythm and styles from our world over to help you move, relate, and be.”
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Mean Love is out now via DFA/ City Slang; listen to “How We Be” below.
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Earth: Primitive And Deadly


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From the press release:
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“With Primitive And Deadly, guitarist Dylan Carlson and long term cohort, drummer Adrienne Davies, manage to pull off the trick of completing an Ouroborean creative cycle, twenty-five years in the making, whilst exploring new directions in their music. For the first time in their diverse second act, Earth allow themselves to be a rock band, freed of adornment and embellishment. The dialogue between Carlson and Davies remains pivotal, here underpinned by the sympathetic bass of Bill Herzog  and thickened by additional layers of guitar from Brett Netson and Jodie Cox. Perhaps the largest left turn on Primitive And Deadly, is the prominence of guest vocalists Mark Lanegan and Rabia Shaheen Qazi (Rose Windows) who transform the traditionally free ranging meditations of Earth into something approaching traditional pop structures. The foundation of the record was laid in the mystic desert high lands of Joshua Tree, California, where Earth recorded hour after hour of meditations on each track’s central theme at Rancho de la Luna. Upon returning to Seattle these were edited, arranged and expanded upon at Avast with the help of long-term collaborator Randall Dunn. Thick, dense and overdriven, melodically rich and enveloping, Primitive And Deadly is Earth reaffirming their position as a singular point in the history of rock.”
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Primitive And Deadly is out now via Southern Lord; listen to “From The Zodiacal Light”.
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