The Drink: Company


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From the press release:
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“Few bands would cause Rough Trade to toss their rulebook out the window, but upon hearing the arresting sound of two handmade EPs by London trio The Drink, the independent record store did just that – stocking an unsigned band’s release for the first time in recent history. Newly signed to Melodic, The Drink are now set to intoxicate further with the arrival of their gloriously inventive debut album Company. Collecting together those now-unavailable EPs, the record has an inimitable, wayward sound drawn from the chaos of real life. “People and places shape the sound – I get ideas from watching people do their thing and also looking at billboards thinking that everything is fucked,” says singer and guitarist Dearbhla Minogue. Without clear narratives, the lyrics have a stream-of-consciousness quality, loaded with uncanny imagery. “I try to invoke feelings of familiarity and imagery in songs because that is what I love about hearing good lyrics. For them to invoke something that you recognise and makes you feel a certain way but you’re not quite sure why.” In the way bands such as Deerhoof and Field Music are revered for their unusual sonic approach, The Drink celebrate beauty in oddness through their use of bold syncopated rhythms, strange time signatures and complex structures, via a love of artists from Joanna Newsom to The Breeders and Captain Beefheart. While many lose their sense of melodic direction labouring to create an intriguing experimental sound, on Company it never wanes through the band’s boundless energy, reverberating basslines and unforgettably spontaneous fusion of American and English indie rock with Irish folk leanings. “We don’t set out to write odd songs at all” says Dearbhla. “We just write them as we think they sound interesting and they always turn out to be in bizarre time patterns when it comes to putting them together.””
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Company is out December 8 via Melodic; listen to “Wicklow” below.
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Trash Kit: Confidence


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From the bio:
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Trash Kit have a wild feel for melody, writing songs that pull at the reins with a spontaneous charm. Having formed the band in 2009, Rachel Aggs, Rachel Horwood and Ros Murray have since become the glowing core of London’s DIY underground. Their music is primal yet thoughtful, affirming yet sincere, drawing on the potential of post-punk and the naturalism of an internal folk music. Although they have their forebears in bands like X-Ray Spex, The Ex and The Raincoats, their sound is very much their own take on facing forwards. Galloping polyrhythms, overlapping sung-spoke lyrics and entwining guitars are all drawn together into a taut unity, sounding willfully alive. Both Rachels tangle their vocals with each other whilst expressive drumbeats and restless guitar flurries provide the rhythmic drive. Aggs’ guitar playing is as much informed by African fingerstyle patterns as the percussive attitude of various no wave shredders. Horwood approaches her drumkit with an untamable freedom, pushing it into the realm of a vivid lead instrument. Trash Kit’s music is full of pauses, woven silence and punctuation too and this is where Ros Murray and her resonant, soulful bass work finds a perfect home.
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As a follow up to their exuberant, eponymous debut album, Confidence sticks with the “play it all live” pluck we’ve come to expect from Trash Kit. There’s a minimal bent, a lyrical directness, an unadorned ethic that all evokes the sense that the song is being written at the same time as it’s performed. Yet whilst the first album at times felt too fleeting, its succinct songs flashing by so fast, Confidence is startlingly more assured, allowing ideas to develop, conclusions to be gathered. Tracks like ‘Hair’, ‘Skin’ and ‘Boredom’ embrace dynamics like never before. Their clatter and chime are complimented through subtler passages of introspection and the occasional noisy breakdown, with snare and cymbals approaching roar. Ros is joined by her previous bandmate Verity Susman (of Electrelane) on a few tracks including the adventurous ‘Shyness’ and lead single ‘Medicine’, lending some fluently inventive saxophone flourishes. It all adds to the heady, sensation of free-falling through the album; a feeling that the horizon has become broader. Overall a feeling that you must run with the moment and trust in yourself emerges, echoed brilliantly through the instrumentation. There’s a restless energy that abounds, a momentum growing stronger, an alchemy at play between each member of Trash Kit and between each song on Confidence. It’s this reason why we should listen closer, listen to the sum of the parts, listen to ourselves. One day we’ll find gold where once there was only hope.”
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Confidence is out December 1 on Upset The Rhythm; check out “Medicine” below.
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Duppy Gun Productions: Multiply Vol. 1

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From the label:
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Duppy Gun is an “Outer-Orbit” Dancehall label and production team founded and operated by Cameron Stallones (Sun Araw) and M. Geddes Gengras. Stallones and Gengras ferry a growing family of Duppy Gun producers including Peaking Lights, Sun Araw, M. Geddes Gengras, Matthewdavid, Alex Gray (D/P/I), Butchy Fuego (San Gabriel) and more to Jamaica and record vocalists wherever they are able to find talent and an electrical outlet.
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The label’s origins, recounted by Stallones: “In 2011 a man approached me, gestured to a red, green, and gold-painted hole into a parallel life, and suggested I step through it I did. One of the main products of that decision was a record called Icon Give Thank, a collection of music created while living and recording with The Congos in Portmore, Jamaica. A little later, that ball rolled a little farther and Ged and I decided to self-manufacture a 12-inch record, and to everyone’s great advantage, Stones Throw Records white-knighted the whole shebang and agreed to help with the tasks in which we had proved incompetent. And so Duppy Gun Productions was born proper.”
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The full-length album Multiply, Duppy Gun Prod. Vol. 1 collects their work to date – a multi-producer, multi-artist double-album compilation of selections with Jamaican vocalists I Jahbar, Early One, Fyah Flames, Dayone, G Sudden, Lukan I, Bookfa, Singin’ Crazy, and Cerassietea.”
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Multiply Vol. 1 is out now; listen to “Mad” ft. Early One & I Jahbar below.
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Megafortress: Believer

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From the press release:
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“Believer, the debut full-length from Megafortress, is not a meditation on faith or devotion. It is a search, constantly twisting into darkness, where the identities of every object and intentions of every figure are unclear. The tracks seem to follow a sole searcher, a lost person, for whom faith is not a source of light amidst the obscurity but a delusion that only makes the ambiguities more terrifying. Megafortress is the solo work of Brooklyn artist Bill Gillim. In 2012, Software released his eponymous debut EP, a collection of gorgeous vocal meditations and ambient soundscapes. Believer boasts a bolder, naked vocal approach, telling a hauntingly intimate story. The ten songs give shape to a world that on the surface seems sweet and welcoming, but, in time, slowly unravels into a place of disorder, sickness, and disappearance. That ambiguity is written into the album at all levels; aurally, the record is at once lush and spare. Layered synthesizers and saxophone, occasional bass, sampled bells and natural sounds, tweaked voices, and Gillim’s warm, unaffected vocals create a honeyed sonic backdrop. However each track adheres to a kind of patient minimalism of its own logic. The songs persistently resist climax, instead corkscrewing or turning into the unexpected: minor and discordant notes, interrupted thoughts, always toward an eerie stillness. That balance of melody and discord, hope and haunting, is reiterated in the overall arc of the record, which takes us over a route of happier melody into darker, more anxious, more echoing and spacious zones, until we are left, lying on our backs, hearing ourselves breathe. All the while, the story we are being told in words is revealed to be one of self-deception, devious and obscure figures, and wishful thinking.”
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Believer is out now on Driftless Recordings; listen to “Live In Grace” below.
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ZOM: Flesh Assimilation

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From Metal Hammer:
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“Forged in the furious hellfires of Dublin, ZOM have been rising rapidly through the occult-minded, murk-mired extreme metal ranks of late, playing to packed, fist-shaking crowds on both sides of Irish Sea, and basically channelling a host of foul and fetid forces in the name of arcane, bug-eyed death metal. With one demo and last year’s Multiversal Holocaust EP setting out their Hades-storming stall, the three-piece are about to unleash their debut album, Flesh Assimilation. For all those who love death metal when it’s visceral, vein-raising and a torrential carrier signal for Satan’s most belligerent battle commanders, we are proud to prise open the sarcophagus and unleash a preview in the form of the track “Conquest” upon the hardy and the unwary alike. Take a deep breath, hold out your arms, call to the soon-to-be-erupting aether “I AM READY!!!” and inhale the heady, lung-collapsing brew that is “Conquest” below!”
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Flesh Assimilation is out now via Invictus Productions
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Fugazi: First Demo


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From the label:
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“In early January 1988 and after only ten shows, Fugazi decided to go into Inner Ear Studio to see what their music sounded like on tape. Despite the fact that Ian, Joe, and Brendan had been playing together for nearly a year, it was still early days for the band. Guy had only been a full member of Fugazi for a few months and only sang lead on one song (“Break-In.”). It would be nearly another year before he would start playing guitar with the band. At that time, the studio was still located in the basement of engineer Don Zientara’s family house. It was a familiar space as almost all of the members of Fugazi had recorded there with their previous bands (Teen Idles, Minor Threat, Deadline, Insurrection, Rites of Spring, Skewbald, Embrace, and One Last Wish). Joey Picuri (aka Joey P), who would later become one of Fugazi’s longtime sound engineers, joined the band for the initial tracking. The sessions only lasted a couple of days, but tour dates and indecision about the tape would delay the final mix for another two months. Though the band was at first pleased with the results, it soon became clear that this tape would remain a demo as new songs were being written and the older songs were evolving and changing shape while the band was out on tour. It was decided that the session would be passed out free as cassette copies, with the band actively encouraging people to share the recording. In the spring, Fugazi went out on its first U.S. tour and a few weeks after returning from the road they went back to Inner Ear to record what would become their debut Dischord release, the self-titled 7-song 12″ EP. The only song from the demo session that was formally released was “In Defense of Humans”, which appeared on the State of the Union compilation in 1989. Now, some 26 years later, Dischord is releasing the entire first demo including the one song (“Turn Off Your Guns”) that wasn’t included on the original cassette. This release also coincides with the completion of the initial round of uploads to the Fugazi Live Series website. Launched in 2011, the site lists and details all of Fugazi’s 1000+ performances and makes available close to 900 concert recordings that were documented by the band and by the public, as well as countless flyers, ticket stubs, posters, and photographs. After two years of work, all of the recordings in the band’s archive are finally posted.”
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First Demo is out now on Dischord Records; listen to “Merchandise” below.
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Tallesen: Stills Lit Through

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From the label:
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“Hailing from the Hudson Valley of New York, Tallesen – born Cayman Johnson – describes Stills Lit Through as a response to the “continuous flexibility of the physical setting by the additive of sound,” a reference to his joyful erasure of the distinction between music and experience. The twelve songs of Stills conjure an eidolon of melodies painted with watercolor brushstrokes both calm (“Glenticast”) and frenetic (“Emmel”). To our ears, this closely characterizes Johnson’s work as a visual artist. The collection when taken as a whole is wonderfully consistent. We hear echoes of Autechre’s corporal maneuvers (bass as lead voice, plasticity of foreground vs. background), but, if you dig out the provenance of Johnson’s nom de plum, you really start to understand how the melodic through-lines of the record operate on a more illustrative level. What appears to you as a macro-level core ‘feeling’ about the record is illusively varied, consisting of insanely lush song nodes that subtly and endlessly rotate and shift. It is a music that is both ultra beautiful (“Strike Silver, Love Green”) and invested in a core belief dealing with the materiality of musical sound itself (“Plasticized Fsa”). It’s not the house in which melodies are stored, it’s the crypt of inspiration from which melodies emerge from. Rhythmically, Stills encourages ephemera towards the creation of a seductively creaky, silvery universe with an unreliable sense of gravity. The result is hallucinatory in that the album comprehensively experiences like volumes among volumes of thigs change, but in half-speed.  “The music is saturated with information for it to remain flexible to its surroundings,” describes Cayman, an ode to feeling “ambiance with a modern degree of attention.””
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Stills Lit Through is out now on Software; check out “Emmel” below.
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Raspberry Bulbs: Privacy

From the press release:

“Privacy is the new album by Raspberry Bulbs, the invention of visual artist and musician Marco del Rio who, under the guise of He Who Crushes Teeth, co-founded Bone Awl – one of the most distinguished black metal projects ever to come out of the USA. Their second full-length offering for Blackest Ever Black, following 2013’s Deformed WorshipPrivacy is a defence of the anti-social, the secretive, and the inward-looking; a call to resist the contemporary obsession with “connection”, exhibitionism and peer approval, and to claw back ownership of the self. It’s only then that the real battles begin. Privacy arrives barely a year after its predecessor, but it’s a markedly more developed and far-reaching album. Songs of excoriating intensity once again form the basis of the work – the no-frills 4-track recording capturing all the violence and nuance of del Rio’s vocals, of the dual guitar rapport, and the machine-gun rhythm section – but this time they’re interspersed with eerie electronic miniatures, instrumental pieces that suggest unseen worlds, malign energies, forces beyond our comprehension and control. This aura of the uncanny is no accident. Though it’s practically impossible to describe Raspberry Bulbs’ music without mentioning punk or metal, the band’s most important influences are not musical, but literary: in particular the “weird fiction” of Lovecraft, Machen, Chambers et al. Privacy certainly has far more to do with this esoteric lineage than it does with contemporary punk or metal cultures. Indeed, the spirit of “weird fiction” runs not just through this album but through all del Rio’s prior projects, and even his root influences – explicit Lovecraftian references abound, after all, in everything from The Fall to Rudimentary Peni to Morbid Angel. Privacy, then, is perhaps best understood as an entry into this cross-discipline canon of the “Weird” – a genre concerned with transformation, sacrifice, forbidden knowledge and fate. In rejecting the outside world and turning inwards to face “the boundless and hideous unknown”, Raspberry Bulbs have delivered their defining statement.”
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Privacy is out now on Blackest Ever Black; listen to “Light Surrounds Me” below.
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Andy Stott: Faith In Strangers


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From NPR:
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“For the better part of the ’00s, Manchester electronic producer Andy Stott shuffled through variations across the techno spectrum in numerous singles: tech-house, minimal, dub and more. But in between his 2006 debut and his 2011 EP We Stay Together, Stott’s aesthetic (from the cover art to the tracks within) cohered into something far darker and gloomier. His beats slowed to a crawl and began to lumber, the atmosphere surrounding them foreboding; Stott’s production shift was akin to a welterweight suddenly gaining 50 pounds of muscle and punching as a heavyweight. His follow-up EP, Passed Me By, was equally pummeling. But just when it seemed like Stott’s productions would remain in “cement mixer” mode, a figure from his past informed 2012’s Luxury Problems. Stott had reached out to Alison Skidmore, his old piano teacher, to ask if she would contribute vocals to the album. Her breathy, operatic voice added a glint of light to the darkness, and the resulting set of songs formed a beguiling mixture of grace and brutality. That collaboration continues to evolve and find new nuances on Faith In Strangers, which shows Stott alternating between the ethereal and viscous sludge. “Time Away” is a slow and shifting drone that could double as a foghorn. It’s almost nine minutes into the album before a beat begins to thud and noise overtakes “Violence,” but Stott wraps Skidmore’s whisper around it just as quickly. Throughout the album, he contrasts between extremes, and in the eight-minute “An Oath,” he expertly balances her wordless vocals, a skittering beat and ambience that conjures images of an abandoned steel factory at night. Faith In Strangers also shows that Stott is no longer beholden to techno’s relentless four-on-the-floor beat. Plenty of drifting moments pop up on the album, as well as songs like “Science And Industry,” with its sped-up beat recalling a Casio “samba” preset gone haywire. At other times, electro beats are set at half-speed. A gentle, skittering drum runs through the title track, while the album’s most menacing beat, “Damage,” is also one of Stott’s trickiest, a drum-and-bass break that tips into the red. In the album-closing ambient drift of “Missing,” glitching electronics and eeriness prevail. Here, Skidmore’s gorgeous vocals work similarly to Julee Cruise’s voice on the Twin Peaks soundtrack, with a timbre that suggests beauty while also accentuating the dread just beneath the surface.”
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Faith In Strangers is out now on Modern Love; listen to “Violence” below.
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Ariel Pink: pom pom

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From the label:
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“Across its 17 tracks and 69 minutes, pom pom is unfiltered Ariel Pink, the Pied Piper of the absurd, with infectious tales of romance, murder, frog princes and Jell-O. The record sees the Los Angeles native strike it out alone, returning to the solo moniker he has adopted well over a decade ago when cementing his name as a king of pop perversion (“Although this is the first *solo* record credited to my name, it is by far the least *solo* record I have ever recorded” Pink explains). From demented kiddie tune collaborations with the legendary psych producer and pop prankster Kim Fowley (songs like “Jell-O” and “Plastic Raincoats In The Pig Parade” were written with Fowley in his hospital room during his recent battle with cancer), to beatific, windswept pop (“Put Your Number In My Phone”, “Dayzed Inn Daydreams”), scuzz-punk face-melters (“Goth Bomb”, “Negativ Ed”), and carnival dub psychedelia (“Dinosaur Carebears”), pom pom is Ariel Pink’s magnum opus.”
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pom pom is out now on 4AD; check out “Picture Me Gone” and “Black Ballerina” below.
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